Full Day Argolis Tour


Full day experience at Argolis

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Corinth Canal

The Corinth Canal is a canal that connects the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. It cuts through the narrow Isthmus of Corinth and separates the Peloponnese from the Greek mainland, thus effectively making the former peninsula an island. The builders dug the canal through the Isthmus at sea level; no locks are employed. It is 6.4 kilometres (4 mi) in length and only 21.4 metres (70 ft) wide at its base, making it impassable for most modern ships. It now has little economic importance.

Ancient Corinth

Corinth was a city-state (polis) on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnese to the mainland of Greece, roughly halfway between Athens and Sparta. The modern town of Corinth is located approximately 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) northeast of the ancient ruins. Since 1896, systematic archaeological investigations of the Corinth Excavations by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens have revealed large parts of the ancient city, and recent excavations conducted by the Greek Ministry of Culture have brought important new facets of antiquity to light.

Mycenae

Mycenae is an archaeological site in Greece, located about 90 kilometres (56 miles) southwest of Athens, in the north-eastern Peloponnese. Argos is 11 kilometres (7 miles) to the south; Corinth, 48 kilometres (30 miles) to the north. From the hill on which the palace was located, one can see across the Argolid to the Saronic Gulf.

In the second millennium BC, Mycenae was one of the major centres of Greek civilization, a military stronghold which dominated much of southern Greece. The period of Greek history from about 1600 BC to about 1100 BC is called Mycenaean in reference to Mycenae. At its peak in 1350 BC, the citadel and lower town had a population of 30,000 and an area of 32 hectares.

Nafplio

Nafplio is a seaport town in the Peloponnese in Greece that has expanded up the hillsides near the north end of the Argolic Gulf. The town was an important seaport held under a succession of royal houses in the Middle Ages as part of the lordship of Argos and Nauplia, held initially by the de la Roche following the Fourth Crusade before coming under the Republic of Venice and, lastly, the Ottoman Empire. The town was the capital of the First Hellenic Republic and of the Kingdom of Greece, from the start of the Greek Revolution in 1821 until 1834. Nafplio is now the capital of the regional unit of Argolis.

Leaving Athens behind we drive on the coastal road towards the West.  Our first stop (after approximately one hour) is the Corinth Canal.   There we’ll make a short stop, enough to see the Canal, (approx. 6 km long connecting the Aegean with the Ionian Sea), take photos and visit the local cafeteria.  Twenty minutes later we’ll arrive at the small town of Ancient Corinth where we’ll visit the archaeological site with the unique monolithic Temple of Apollo (one of the oldest in Greece, 585 B.C.), the Bema from where St. Paul preached and the museum.

Driving afterwards trough the hills of Corinth, among thousands of olive trees and vineyards, we’ll arrive at prefecture of Argolis where we’ll visit the archaeological site of Mycenae.

Mycenae, 'Rich in Gold', was the kingdom of mythical Agamemnon, who dominated the Aegean Sea after the distraction of the Minoan Empire.   The city looks out across the plain of Argos to the sea.  It’s elevated position and it’s huge Cyclopean Walls, offered protection from surprise attacks by pirates and enemies.  At the peak of its power (1300 B.C.) the population leaved around the fortress where the Royal Family had its Palace.  The Palace, symbol of power of the Mycenaean rulers, was reached by a large ramp beginning at the Lions Gate.

Outside the fortress lie the impressive beehive tombs including that ascribed to Agamemnon known also as the Treasury of Atreas.

After concluding our visit to Mycenae we’ll drive through the plain of Argos among endless farms of orange trees and forty minutes later we’ll arrive to the picturesque town of Nafplion (First capital of modern Greece, from 1829 to 1834).

Nafplion is the most ancient city in Greece.  According to the myth it was founded by Theseas who first conceived the idea of organized cities where people could live together.  The city lies under the imposing rocks of Palamide the most formidable Venetian Castle in the Eastern Mediterranean.  The smaller Castle of Acronafplia (where the ancient city was founded) crowns Naflion and at the entrance of the harbor, in the Argolic Gulf, there is yet another, third Castle Bourtzi, situated on a small islet.

Whether you decide to have lunch in the old medieval quarter, with the narrow, stoned paved streets, or by the port, with the view of Bourtzi,  Nafplion is the best choice for lunch in this trip.

After concluding our visit to Nafplion we’ll start the return trip to Athens.

PLEASE READ THE INFORMATION BELOW AS WELL AS OUR TERMS OF SERVICEBEFORE BOOKING YOUR TOUR:

►All prices include all taxes, fuel, insurance, and parking fees.

► The total price for the tour is per group size. Individuals may split the cost of the tour among themselves as they wish.  

►This tour does NOT include entrance fees to any archeological site and museum,meals, hotel accommodations, gratuities, or other client personal expenses. Driver’s hotel expenses are not included in the price but If our company book the hotels we use frequently you can avoid this cost. If you wish to book your own hotels then you need to pay a room for the driver.

► For your safety inside the vehicle, drivers provide commentaryonly when it is deemed safe to do so while driving. When your driver must concentrate during difficult driving conditions, please refrain from any distracting behavior as your safety during the tour is our top priority.

► Greece has strict laws and regulations in place to protect licensed tour guides, this it makes it unlawful for Tour Drivers to offer commentary about sites outside the vehicle. In order for us to comply with Greek laws, Tour Drivers may not tour our guests near or inside monuments or museums. Your Tour Driver will provide commentary and basic information only inside the vehicle. Only licensed Tour Guides may accompany or guide you at the sites you visit. If you wish to have a personal licensed tour guide please include this on your request.

► Your Driver will drop you off as close to the sites as legally possible and in accordance to the local Municipality and Traffic laws of Greece.

►Once you fill out our booking form and provide your credit card information, you are legally bound to a contract with us.

► Our service is solely confirmed when the potential customer has received an email confirming services along with the details of the tour. If the confirmation email is not received than please conclude that the service has not been confirmed. We suggest you contact us immediately for further clarification.

► Modes of Payment: Payment for the tour will be made in Euro funds at the end of your journey. 

Important Note: Only cash payments are accepted for licensed tour guide services.

Cancellation policy:

Please, note that there will be no charge if you cancel your reservation by e-mail within at least 5 days before date of requested service. If is not done in these terms, our company reserves the right to debit the "no show fee" on your credit card which is the total amount of requested services.

► Cancellations are accepted only via E-Mail so your cancellation is on record. We do not accept cancellations by phone, text message, or 3rd parties.

► If you have contacted us earlier asking for specific dates but have not confirmed those dates, it does not mean that these specific dates have been reserved for you and therefore may no longer be available. We will do our best to satisfy any need of a last minute request but obviously based on what we have available

All our private tours are flexible.  It is always up to you to change the itinerary according to your wishes.

Admission fees and lunch are not included in the price of the trip

Admission Tickets

Ancient Corinth:   6 euros including the museum

Mycenae:              6 euros including the tomb of Agamemnon

Epidaurus:            6 euros including the Museum

Free admission for: 

Children under 19

Students from E.U.

Reduced admission for:

Citizens of the E.U. aged over 65

Students from countries outside the E.U.

Sites’ Opening Hours

  • Summer                                                

From 1st April until 31 October

08:00-19:30

  • Winter

From 01.11.2007 to 31.03.2008

08:30-15:00

  • Holidays

1 January:   closed

6 January:   08:30 - 15:00

Shrove Monday:  08:30 - 15:00

25 March:  closed

Good Friday:  12:00 - 15:00

Holy Saturday:  08:30 - 15:00

1 May:  closed

Easter Sunday:  closed

Easter Monday:  08:30 - 15:00

Holy Spirit Day: 08:30 - 15:00

15 August:  08:30 - 15:00

28 October:   08:30 - 15:00

25 December:  closed

26 December:  closed

  • Free admission days

  6 March  In memory of deceased Minister of Tourism & visionary Melina Mercouri

  5 June   International Environment Day 

18 April   International Monuments Day 

18 May   International Museums Day 

27 September   International Tourism Day

*  The last weekend of September annually (European Heritage Days)

*  Sundays in the period between 1 November and 31 March

*  National Holidays

*  The first Sunday of every month, except for July, August and  

    September (when the first Sunday is a holiday, then the second is the  

    free admission day).

Details

Start Location
Athens
End Location
Athens
Duration
Depending on guests
Operating
Depending on availability. Please email us for prices
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